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How are Adverbs and Adjectives Connected? Grammar Review Video

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Video English LessonsHow are Adverbs and Adjectives Connected?

Adverbs and Adjectives have a direct connection. Why? It’s because many adverbs are created from adjectives.

This is often accomplished by adding “l y, i l y, a l l y, or y,” to an adjective to create an adverb.

Once you learn adjectives, now you are ready to learn adverbs in different forms. Remember that some adverbs are “irregular” and they do not follow the normal rule.

Adjectives that Modify Nouns:

Sally wore a beautiful dress to the party!

Slow taxi’s are everywhere in New York!

He is a terrible saxophone player!

The live concert last night finished at three in the morning!

Adverbs that Modify Verbs:

Sally played the piano beautifully!

The taxi drove slowly!

He played the saxophone terribly!

The rock group played music loud and lively!

Irregular Adjectives that Modify Nouns:

He is a fast runner!

She is a good cook!

Irregular Adverbs that Modify Verbs:

They always run so fast!

She cooks so well!

Remember that Adjectives help describe how something feels, sounds, looks, tastes and acts.

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Adverbs and Adjectives Everyday Dialog.

Adverbs and adjectives.
How are they connected?
And why is it important?
They do have a
direct connection.
Why?
Well because many adverbs
are created from adjectives.
This is often accomplished
by adding
ly, ily, ally, or y
to an adjective.
And once you learn
adjectives, now
you’re ready to learn
adverbs in different forms.
Remember that,
Some adverbs are irregular
and they do not follow
the normal or a normal rule.
Here are some adjectives
that modify nouns.
Can you find the adjective?
Let’s hope so.
Sally wore a beautiful dress
to the party.
The Live concert last night
finished at three
in the morning.
By the way,
that word “live”!
Don’t forget it’s pronounced
“live”
when we use it
as an adjective.
As a verb,
it is pronounced,
“live”.
I live, I like.
Those are verbs.
The “live” concert.
Now I’m using it
before a noun.
Concert is in noun. Right?
Now I’m using it before
“concert” a noun.
It’s pronounced “live”.
Because it is
an adjective.
Here are some
adverbs that modify verbs.
Can you find them?
Let’s take a look.
Sally played the piano
“Beautifully”.
Now remember in
the previous example
we said something about
“Beautiful”.
She is beautiful. Right?
That’s an adjective.
We took beautiful
and we made a little
change at the end of
it was an “ly”. Right?
And now she played
the piano “beautifully”.
“Beautifully” is your adverb
and we’re using it
to help us
explain the word
“played”. Right?
Played is a verb.
The taxi drove slowly.
Ah! “Slowly”.
Drove “slowly”.
Slowly is your adverb.
And “drove” is.
Drive, drove, driven. Right?
Drove is past simple for Drive.
He played the saxophone terribly.
So in this example.
Played “terribly”
“Terribly” is helping
the word play or played
in past simple.
The rock group played
music loud and lively.
“Played lively”
Here are a couple
irregular adjectives that
modify nouns.
Can you find them?
“He is a fast runner”.
Now, we have to be
careful sometimes
because some of the
adverbs and adjectives
are spelled exactly
the same way.
He is a fast runner.
“A runner”
“Runner” is a noun.
Fast is describing
the word “runner”.
She is a good cook.
“Good”
Is your adjective.
Cook is a noun. Right?
Here are two examples with
adverbs that modify verbs.
Can you find those?
They always run
“so fast”.
Now. “So” is an intensifying adverb
and it’s helping the word fast.
“Fast” is an adjective and
an adverb.
Spelled the same way.
We can’t say “fastly”.
Something like that.
They always run so fast.
I could say,
“They always run fast”.
Or I can intensify it
and bring the meaning of that
statement up a little bit
and I could say,
“Hey! They always run so fast.”
She corks so well.
“Well” is your adverb.
Remember that adjectives
help describe how
something or someone
feels, sounds, looks, tastes or acts.