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Adverbs “Quickly and Fast” Grammar Review Video

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Video English LessonsAdverbs “Quickly and Fast” Grammar Review.

The adverb “Quickly,” is used with many tenses. It is normally placed after the main verb. When it is used with the verb “To be,” “Quickly,” goes after the main verb.

The same is true with “Fast.” While they are often interchangeable, it’s important to note that they are used in colloquial speech differently.

Certain word combinations are used commonly in everyday English.

The following are some examples:

Present simple, Present perfect, Present continuous.

How does she run so fast?

She has a great deal of practice.

Has he always run so quickly?

Yes, he has run fast all his life.

Why are they running so fast?

They are late for work.

Other uses with Quickly and Fast:

Why are you eating so fast?

I must return to work quickly!

Who is that running so quickly?

That’s my mom!

How did you get here so fast?

I took the subway!

Vocabulary Bank Definitions.

Adverb: Words that modify or describe “verbs, adjectives and adverbs.”

Colloquial speech: Two or more words commonly used in combination.

Everyday: This is a time adverb. Compare to daily.

Great deal: This is a quantifier. Compare to “A lot or lot’s of.”

Subway: American English. Compare to “The metro or underground.”

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Quickly and Fast Everyday Dialog.

Quickly and Fast
are just two of
the many adverbs
in the English language.
The adverb Quickly
is used with many tenses.
It is normally placed
after the main verb.
When it’s used with
the verb “to be”
quickly goes after
the main verb.
The same is true
with Fast.
While they are often
interchangeable, it’s
important to note
that they are used in
colloquial speech
differently.
Now, colloquial speech!
What? What is that?
Well. Colloquial speech.
I look at colloquial speech,
it’s kind of like
the catch-all.
It’s kind of like the big
travel bag maybe.
Where you put all
the kind of grammar
in there that we’re
really not sure
where it comes from.
When we say certain
things in English,
most of the time,
there’s a pretty good reason.
But there are. Most
of the language is
also about collocations.
Why do we do that?
Well. Often we don’t know.
We don’t know,
why we say this or
why we say that.
Maybe it comes
from the past.
Maybe it comes
from movies.
Something somebody said,
somebody did and
we thought it was
kind of cool or
interesting or
different. So.
Colloquial speech
is simply when
we put words together
that are used
commonly in a language.
If I said to you
right now,
“I’ll meet you
in the morning.”
Well. Why do we say
“in the morning”?
I really don’t know.
Maybe, if we look at
“in the morning” and
compare it to,
let’s say,
a preposition On or At.
Maybe then it
becomes important,
but the real idea is
what is colloquial speech,
or a collocation?
it’s simply two
or more words
that are used commonly
in speech.
Or in a language.
Certain word combinations.
You see. Commonly used.
Here are a few
examples to study.
With present simple,
present perfect and
present continuous.
“How does she
run so fast?”
“She has a great deal
of practice.” So.
In this case “fast”
is your adverb. Right?
“How does she run fast?”
“Fast” helps the
verb “run”.
“Has he always
run so fast?”
I don’t need “so”
in there. By the way.
In this case it’s
used as an
intensifying adverb.
“Has he always run
so quickly?”
I could put “fast”
in there as well.
“Yes. He has
run fast
all his life.”
“Why are they
running so fast?”
“Well. They’re late
for work.”
You see. Run fast
Other uses with
quickly, and fast.
“Why are you eating
so fast?”
“Well. I must return
to work quickly.”
Or. “My boss is
going to fire me.”
“Who is that running
so quickly?”
“Well. That’s my mom.
She’s running to work.”
“How did you
get here so fast?”
“Well. I took the subway
and it’s very fast
because it goes underground
and avoids traffic.”
Here are some
word definitions.
Check your dictionary
for more.
“Adverbs”
Well, adverbs modify verbs,
adjectives and adverbs.
“Colloquial speech”
This is an area,
by the way,
that’s not often
talked about with
most students.
But, it really should be
talked about more, because
talked about more because,
colloquial speech
or collocations,
it’s a part of English,
that there may
or may not be
a good reason for.
“Everyday”
This is a time adverb.
Compare to daily.
I go there everyday.
I go there daily.
Those are time adverbs.
“Great deal”
This is a quantifier compare to
“a lot” or “lots of.”
“There is a great
deal of that.”
“There is a great
deal of milk
in the fridge.”
“There is a lot of milk
in the fridge.”
Remember,
“a lot” and “lots of”
Sometimes students
over use
those quantifiers
because those
can be applied
to countable and
uncountable.
We can use “a great deal”
most of the time.
We use “a great deal”
with uncountable.
But there might be
some times we use it
for countable as well.
“Subway”
“Hey! What’s a subway.”
Well. It’s
American English.
Compare to the metro
or underground.

Vurble American English