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Adverbs “Still and Lately” Grammar Review Video


Video English LessonsAdverbs “Still and Lately” Grammar Review.

The adverbs “Still and Lately,” are two of the many adverbs used in the English language.

These adverbs are used in the “Perfect Tenses,” as well as others. Still is used to refer to an incomplete fact. Lately and still are often interchangeable.

“Still and lately,” are used to form questions, positives and negative statements.

Lately may be used more commonly in formal English. These adverbs can  also be used other ways as well.

Here are Some Examples:

Present simple, perfect and continuous tenses:

Is he still there?

Yes, he is or No, he isn’t.

Have you been ill lately?

Yes, I have or No, I haven’t.

Are you still working at the office?

No, I’m not or Yes, I am.

Other uses with Still and lately:

Can you still go to the park Saturday?

Of course I can!

How have you been lately?

Not bad and you!

Have you been working lately?

Yes, I still work at the factory!

Vocabulary Bank Definitions.

Adverb: Words that modify or describe “verbs, adjectives and adverbs.”

Incomplete: Something that is not finished yet.

Interchangeable: Two items or facts can be used the same way.

Formal: The opposite of casual.

Ill: Sickness or not healthy.

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Still and Lately Everyday Dialog.

“Still” is used to refer
to an incomplete action.
Hey! Is Bill still there?
Yes he is still there.
He is not finished
teaching English yet.
Is it still raining outside?
Well, it sure looks like it.
Yes, it’s still raining outside.
It’s been raining for
some time now. So.
Still is used to refer to an
incomplete fact, action, event.
Something like that.
Lately and still are often
interchangeable as well.
Still and lately are used
to form questions
positives and negative statements.
These adverbs can also
be used in other tenses
as well as perfect.
Here are a few
examples to study.
These examples are with
present simple, perfect
and continuous tenses.
Hey! Is he still there?
Because he was there
earlier today.
I thought he was leaving.
Something like that.
So, something has happened
or been happening
for some time.
And I have a question.
Simple question.
Is he still there?
Yes he is, no he isn’t.
Ah okay, so if he’s still there,
I’m going to speak
with him for a few minutes.
Hey! Have you been ill lately?
Now again,
these words are used
in a number of tenses,
but lately,
does not imply an exact time.
Lately implies a general
period of time but
nothing specific. So.
Hey, have you been ill lately?
You don’t look well.
Well yes I have or
no I haven’t. So.
Have, what have you
been doing lately?
Where have you
been lately?
When? When did? You mean
like last week,
last month, yesterday?
What are you talking about?
Well, I just mean in general.
You see, so, that word is used.
In a general way not
to imply an exact time.
Are you still working
at the office?
No, I’m not or yes I am. So.
Are you still there?
Because you were there an
hour ago when I called you
to come home for dinner.
Other uses with still and lately.
Can you still go
to the park Saturday?
Of course I can.
Now I’m asking a question.
About the future.
In the past, you said something
about going to the park.
But maybe something changed.
Maybe your work changed.
Maybe your boss called you
and said I need you to help
me with this project.
But I don’t know that
you can still go to the park
on Saturday because you and
I already talked about that. So.
Can you still go to
the park on Saturday?
Well, yes I can, I only
have to work until Friday night.
How have you been lately?
Hey! How have you been lately?
This phrase
is very common in English.
When I haven’t seen
you for a while.
Once again.
The word lately is not used
for an exact period of time.
Have. How have you been lately?
What it really means.
Is since the last
time we spoke
or met.
So. Hey how you been lately?
You know since we met
three weeks ago.
Well, I am fine thanks.
I am very happy.
What about you?
I’m well.
I’m not bad. So.
Have you been working lately?
Yes, I still work at the factory.
Again, I haven’t seen you
for two months, three months,
four months. The last time we met
you were talking about
leaving the factory, working,
getting another job.
Maybe something like that.
Hey have you been working lately?
Yes, I have been working.
I still work at the factory.
Here are some word definitions.
Check your dictionary for more.
We’ve talked about this before.
What’s an adverb? Words that
describe or modify verbs,
adjectives and other adverbs.
“Incomplete”
This word complete, we’ve added
a prefix “in” which means
something negative.
Something is incomplete.
It means something
that we haven’t finished yet.
“Interchangeable”
Interchangeable. Five syllables.
Oh my God!
Interchangeable!
Two items or facts
that can be used
the same way. Two things
that you can
compare in some way.
“Formal”
The opposite of casual.
By the way.
“Informal”
Means the same as casual.
“Ill”
Sickness or not healthy.
How do you feel now?
Do you feel ill?
No. I feel fine.
“What have you been doing?”
Well, I’ve been a little ill lately.
Remember, sick, ill
they are very similar
in the way that they are used.