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What are Demonstrative Pronouns? Grammar Review Video

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Video English LessonsWhat are Demonstrative Pronouns?

First! What are pronouns? “Pronouns replace nouns!”

What are “Demonstrative pronouns?”

Demonstrative pronouns are used to replace something very specific. They can stand alone in the general context of a statement!

The demonstrative pronouns are “This, that, these, those.” These four words are also “Demonstrative adjectives.”

The primary difference is that “Demonstrative adjectives go before nouns!”Demonstrative pronouns do not!

This” is used to refer to “One close in proximity!”

That” is used to refer to “One far away!”

These” refer to “More than One close in proximity!”

Those” refer to “More than One far away!”

There is a lot more to this subject and how to use “This, that, these, and those.”  Ask your teacher to further explain the subject of “Demonstrative pronouns and demonstrative adjectives.”

Here are Demonstrative Pronoun Examples:

This is so tasty!

This implies something to eat.

That belongs to Susie!

That implies property.

These are so comfortable!

These imply something to wear.

Those are my best friends over there!

Those imply people.

Demonstrative pronoun examples show that both people understand what subject or object is being referred to without using the noun!

Demonstrative Adjective Examples:

This pizza is so tasty!

This precedes the noun “pizza.”

That phone belongs to Susie!

That precedes the noun “phone.”

These shoes are so comfortable!

These precedes the noun “shoes.”

Those people are my best friends!

Those precedes the noun “people.”

Demonstrative adjective examples show that a further explanation of the object or subject is needed to help the other person better understand!

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Demonstrative Pronoun Everyday Dialog.

Demonstrative pronouns
are used to replace
something very specific.
They can stand alone, or
in the general context
of a statement.
Those words are;
“This, that, these and those.
These four words
are also
“demonstrative adjectives.”
The primary difference is
that, demonstrative adjectives
go before a noun.
Demonstrative pronouns do not.
“This” is used
to refer to “one.” So.
In this case, look.
I have one book.
This is my book.
“Mine.” This is mine.
That’s something else.
Today, we’re just gonna do this.
This is my book. “This.”
It means “one.” Right?
What’s the next one? Ah!
That. So.
If there was something
that was over
across the room. Let’s say.
That is yours.
That is hers.
That is.
“These.”
These refer to
more than one. So.
Look! I have two books.
One and two.
“These” refers to more
than one.
One book.
“This is” mine or
“These are” mine.
I could say; “These
are yours.” Here!
Take them please. Yes?
Happy New Year.
Merry Christmas.
Or maybe, happy birthday.
Something like that.
“Those” refer to
more than one far away. So.
If these two books were
over there somewhere,
I could say;
Hey! “Those books” are yours.
Take them when you
go home tonight
and have fun
reading them.
This grammar review is for.
Is a simple explanation
of pronouns.
Hey! There’s a lot more
to this subject and
how to use;
“This, that, these and those.”
Ask your teacher
to further explain
demonstrative pronouns
and demonstrative adjectives.
Now, here are
some examples.
“Demonstrative pronoun examples.”
Remember that demonstrative
pronoun examples show
that both people
understand what
subject or object
is being referred to
without using the noun.
This is so tasty.
So. “This” implies
something to eat. Let’s say
we’re having pizza. Right?
I could say, this
pizza or takeout
“The noun.” We don’t need it.
It’s too much.
Remember that
when native speakers
are talking, they
often take words out.
If you understand what
they’re talking about,
why do we need extra words
if they’re not necessary.
I could say,
“this pizza is so tasty.” But,
you and I are having pizza.
We’re enjoying ourselves and
there for I’m not
going to use the noun.
Hey! “That” belongs to
Susie over there!
“That” implies property.
Maybe, it’s a bicycle.
It’s a house.
It’s a car. Something like that.
“That” mobile phone, yeah?
That belongs to Susie. So.
“That” again.”
“That” means “one.”
“These” are so comfortable.
Maybe it’s the shoes
I’m wearing and it’s true,
because my shoes
are comfortable.
“More than one.”
Those are my best friends
over there. You see that?
Bob and Sally.
“Those” are my best friends. So.
In this context “those” is
two or more.
Here are some demonstrative
adjective examples. Now.
Demonstrative adjective
examples show that a
further explanation of
the object or subject is
needed to help
the other person better
understand. So. Listen!
This pizza
is so tasty.
I gave you the other examples
first to help explain
what a demonstrative
adjective is.
Not a pronoun. So.
If it goes before
the noun,
it’s going to be
a demonstrative adjective.
“Adjectives” usually
go before the noun. So.
This pizza is so tasty!
“This” precedes or goes
before the noun “pizza.”
Hey! That phone
belongs to Susie! Well.
“That.” The word “that”
precedes the noun “phone.”
So. If we wanted
to make a choice for instance.
Hey! I see three
phones over there.
Which one is Suzie’s?
Well, that one.
Not that and not that.
You see?
“These” shoes
are so comfortable.
“These” precedes
the noun, shoes.
So. In this case.
“These shoes.” Or.
Hey! These are so comfortable.
“These” is now
an adjective.
Because it goes
before the noun.
Those people
are my best friends.
“Those.” Those people
over there. Right?
So. Again.
This is an adjective.
Hey! Have fun
with pronouns.
It’s a really interesting
subject and
we do need them
in the English language.

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